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10 Toxic Foods that You Should Not Give to Your Dog

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9. Wild Mushrooms

wild mushroom

Ingestion of wild mushrooms is dangerous for dogs, while common white mushrooms appear to be safe for dogs to eat.

Once consumed, wild mushrooms can cause abdominal pain, drooling, liver damage, kidney damage, vomiting, restlessness, diarrhea, convulsions, excessive urination, salivation, coma or death. If not treated timely, the accumulation of toxins in the pet’s body can lead to kidney and liver failure.

A 1989 study published in the Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation reports that liver necrosis is caused by mushroom poisoning in dogs. The study says that several Amanita species contain a toxin compound known as amanitin, which plays a significant role in poisonings. It can affect the autonomic nervous system, central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract.

A 2007 study published in Veterinary Medicine reports that Amanita, Galerina and Lepiota species of mushrooms contain toxic cyclopeptides. In fact, Amanita species are the most common cause of fatal mushroom poisoning in dogs and even account for 95 percent of mushroom-related fatalities in people.

As with most poisonings, the best method of controlling mushroom toxicity in dogs is preventing exposure.

10. Any Food with Artificial Sweeteners

diet drinks

Soda, cupcakes, candies, muffins, cookies, pieces of gum or anything that contains artificial sweeteners should not be given to your dog. These products may contain xylitol, an artificial sweetener that can lead to the over-release of insulin, kidney failure and worse.

Some common signs of xylitol toxicity include vomiting, weakness, ataxia, depression, hypokalemia, seizures, coma and liver dysfunction or failure. These symptoms mostly occur after 30 minutes of ingestion of this toxic compound.

A 2004 study published in Veterinary and Human Toxicology reports that dogs may develop hypoglycemia following ingestion of gum containing xylitol.

Another study published in the same journal in the same year reports that activated charcoal administration may be beneficial in some canine acute oral xylitol exposures.

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One thought on “10 Toxic Foods that You Should Not Give to Your Dog”

  1. Thank you very much! This information was extremely helpful; some things I thought were special treats aren’t good for my dogs at all!!! I will share your site and this information with everyone I can!

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